Bir zamanlar Anadoluʼda

Bir zamanlar Anadoluʼda

Downloadable Video - 2012 | Turkish
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Winner of the Grand Prix at the Cannes Film Festival - and one of the best reviewed films of the year - Once Upon a Time in Anatolia is the new film from the celebrated director of Distant, Climates, and Palme d'or winner Winter's Sleep. Stunningly photographed, the film follows a murder investigation into the Anatolian countryside that rattles the investigators' own beliefs and truths.
Publisher: [United States] : Cinema Guild : Made available through hoopla, 2012.
ISBN: 9780781514002
Branch Call Number: eVideo hoopla
Characteristics: 1 online resource (1 video file (ca. 157 min.)) : sd., col.
Alternative Title: Once upon a time in Anatolia

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n
nparrish
Sep 13, 2016

Truly one of the worst movies I ever sat through in my life. The box makes it sound like a suspenseful, intricate mystery with complicated characters & interesting twists. Instead, it's a rambling ride in a car with a bunch of fat idiots who do nothing, say nothing, learn nothing. I kept waiting & waiting & waiting for something to happen, even just some interesting conversation. Maybe I missed a couple lines that explain it all, but mostly they talk about made-up personal crap, not much about Turkey itself. At the end there's an autopsy which sort of implies who the killer was, but it's totally unclear why or how etc. The movie travels through the Turkey countryside, but shows us absolutely nothing of the nature or scenery. Instead we just see the same dark hills & fat bumbling idiots...In a car. At one point they stop in a stupid village full of religious morons & talk about goats. The only females in the movie are there to remind us that they're basically treated like farm animals. About as thought-provoking as watching hillbillies sit on a porch. Mind-boggingly long at 2.5 HOURS, seldom have I seen so much time wasted w/so little contained. I cannot say enough bad things about this nap-inducer. To me, it says a lot about Cannes & the sad state of storytelling itself. The fact that this trash got so many 4-5-star ratings only shows what a smug, pretentious, elitist joke it is. I guess you have to "get it", right?

v
voisjoe1_0
Sep 24, 2015

“Once Upon a Time in Anatolia” was tied with “The Kid with a Bike” for the Grand Prize of Jury of the Cannes Film Fest which means it was considered to be the second best film of the year. This film has enough complexity that a second viewing will be very rewarding. There are some scenes with more than five major characters in the shot at one time, all reacting with what they or others are saying or doing. Director Nuri Bilge Ceylan is on a hot streak as this film and four others have been granted major prizes at Cannes.

n
Nursebob
Dec 31, 2014

On a darkening landscape of barren hillsides and rustling grassland a lonely convoy of police cars slowly makes its way along a tortuous country road. A murder has been committed and the prime suspect is leading police on an apparent wild goose chase in search of the victim’s body. As night falls and a tempest rages in the skies above the officials in charge, including a medical examiner and public prosecutor, engage each other in banal conversations and idle gossip while the prime suspect seems to stare at something only he can see. Nuri Ceylan’s latest masterpiece starts out as a police procedural but quickly morphs into a deeply discomfiting psychodrama as he explores the many ways people lie both to others and to themselves. It seems everyone in this small motorcade has a secret to hide or a skewed tale to tell and the landscape, as if sensing their self-delusion, answers back with lightning bolts and howling winds. Ceylan once again proves himself to be a master of both large canvas imagery as we see the natural world threaten to overwhelm the screen with ominous portents and the delicately ethereal as a simple offering of tea carries the spiritual impact of an angelic visitation. The film ends appropriately enough with an enigmatic mix of guilt, recrimination and deception which suggests a greater truth while revealing nothing.

btmslt Dec 03, 2013

A bit to long and drawn out but somewhat interesting look at police activity and the lives of those invovled with the prosecution of crime.

i
ilovewhippets
Jul 23, 2013

This is a slow-moving movie.. The story is not bad; although, it carries definite sadness throughout.... Most of the story is spent in the car, talking, in the darkness...It is a bit better than it sounds..some conversations are actually interesting..This is a winner of the Cannes Award.. Honestly, I don't understand how they give those awards out..Anyway, this movie has certain softness, reality, sadness... Shows compassion for the underdog..This is a Turkish cultural movie..Things are done differently there..That's educational for us in the West; we take our lives here for granted.... Yet, this movie was "nothing to write home about!" My suggestion... find another movie to watch..

u
uncommonreader
Jul 20, 2013

I believe I understood the themes of this film, but it could not sustain my interest. I watched it to the end, but the final insights were too close to banal to make me glad that I did.

m
ms_mustard
Feb 24, 2013

slowly-paced portrayal of a murder and its aftermath. relative truth revealed in shadow and light. time spent on the road has the flavor of Kiarostami's Taste of Cherry.

love_my_library_card Jan 04, 2013

I saw this in a theater, and perhaps that is the best way to see it--on a big screen. It's a long film that unfolds very slowly, but I was fully absorbed in the characters and story. I especially liked the faces of the actors; no Hollywood-style pretty-boys here, which enhanced the drama. The ending stayed in my mind for days afterward.

m
Mualla
Nov 20, 2012

Director Nuri Bilge Ceylan did an excellent job of cinematography and story telling. Attention to the details was the best. It is a long movie but I even wanted to see it more. It is like reading a book you love it so much and you don't want to finish it. Ceylan does not use music in his movies except this one.The chosen song on the radio at the break of the dawn when the exhausted search party was returning to the town fit the situation well. The song, "Alli Turnam Ne Gezersin Havada" is the song of the very same region where the story took place and sang by a late Turkish traditional bard, Neset Ertas. The song is about someone seeing pink flamingos flying over his/her head and hoping that these birds will also pass through his / her home town that he/she misses so much. In that hope, that person wishes that if the flamingos fly over the home town then they should take the news from him/her to the loved ones left behind. The turkish hospitality was right on the spot. In the middle of the night the search part at least of 15 people drops in a village offical's house and this offical's family prepares dinner to these people in the middle of the night. The story tells the Anatolian people without exaggeration.

Glencoe_Mike Oct 25, 2012

Quite mesmerizing and hypnotic despite feeling like its 6 hours long.

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